Average house price in Roscommon ‘now €193k’

12% rise in 2022

According to the latest Daft.ie Sales Report, which was released earlier this week, the final three months of 2022 saw Roscommon houses prices up 12% on the year previous, compared to the rise of 15% seen a year ago. The average price of a home is now €193,000, 23% below its Celtic Tiger peak.

Nationally, housing prices rose by 6.1% during 2022. The average listed price nationwide in the final quarter of 2022 was €309,941, down 0.4% on the average for the third quarter of the year and 16% below the Celtic Tiger peak. The 6.1% increase in 2022 compares with increases of 8.1% in 2021 and 7.7% in 2020, and a fall of 1.2% in 2019.

Compared to a year previously, prices in Dublin in the final quarter of 2022 were 5% higher, similar to the increase seen in Galway city (5.4%). The increase in the last twelve months was larger in Galway city (8%) and Waterford city (6.4%), while prices in Cork city were 3.3% higher than a year ago. Outside the cities, prices rose by 7.1% on average – with similar increases seen in Leinster, Munster and Connacht-Ulster.

The number of homes available to buy on December 1st stood at just over 15,200, up 33% on the same date last year, but still significantly below the 2019 average of 24,200. The increase in availability on the market has been greatest in Leinster (up 51%) and smallest in Munster (up 19%). The average listed price nationwide in the final quarter of 2022 was €309,941, down 0.4% on the average for the third quarter of the year and 16% below the Celtic Tiger peak.

Commenting on the report, its author Ronan Lyons (economist at Trinity College Dublin) said: “2022 started with a continuation of the significant upward pressure on prices seen during the second half of 2020 and in 2021. However, the year ends with prices falling, albeit modestly, in the final quarter.

“While supply has increased, availability is still tight, indicating that the change in market conditions is more likely driven by a change in the strength of demand. We can see this with expected inflation, which has hit its lowest level since the outbreak of Covid-19, suggesting uncertainty on the part of demand. Overall, with supply recovering and demand softening, it is unlikely that 2023 will see prices gains similar the last three years”.

The full report is available online and includes in-depth commentary by Ronan Lyons.